Wednesday, June 11, 2014 Tuesday, March 18, 2014
montereybayaquarium:

Celebrate children and families at our 13th annual Día del Niño event on Sunday, April 6. Enjoy live Latin music performances, crafts, special bilingual programming and more. Free with Aquarium admission!
Learn more

montereybayaquarium:

Celebrate children and families at our 13th annual Día del Niño event on Sunday, April 6. Enjoy live Latin music performances, crafts, special bilingual programming and more. Free with Aquarium admission!

Learn more

Friday, March 7, 2014
montereybayaquarium:

California residents, “Check the Coast” at tax time! Being a friend to the California coast and ocean is as simple as checking a box on your tax form. It’s an investment in the protection of our spectacular coastline.
Learn more

montereybayaquarium:

California residents, “Check the Coast” at tax time! Being a friend to the California coast and ocean is as simple as checking a box on your tax form. It’s an investment in the protection of our spectacular coastline.

Learn more

Thursday, February 27, 2014 Monday, February 10, 2014
Brevity is the sister of talent. Anton Chekhov (via writingquotes)
Friday, February 7, 2014 Sunday, January 26, 2014

Dave Green- Turkish Anatomist

After being informed that they would have twins, Dave’s parents, who already had brought John to the Earth, immediately made arrangements for one of their babies to immigrate to Nepal directly after birth, where he could be fostered by two kind Nepali farmers with whom the Green Parents had attended college. Several months later, to the Green’s delight, both of their sons emerged into the World completely healthy and happy.

The aforementioned plans were executed perfectly, and before Dave Green had lived for a week, he was on a plane to Nepal. Despite admirable care from several flight attendents, however, Dave was tragically lost in a Turkish airport. The airline, which is no longer in operation, told no one about this terrible incident, since they knew that the parents had no way to communicate with the Nepali farmers who were supposed to receive Dave, and the Nepali farmers weren’t aware of this American child who was traveling to them.

Luckily, an elderly Turkish lady found him in the airport. It needn’t be said that she was extremely perturbed, and set off immediately to tell the Turkish authorites at the airport. Before she reached the authorities, however, she remembered her poor niece’s family. Her niece and her husband had tried to create a family for years, but her niece had been unable to be impregnated and, later, to legally adopt a child.

This Turkish lady knew that her niece would prefer to legally adopt a child, but admitted that this may be her only oppurtunity, so she quickly smuggled the child out of the airport to her home, ignoring her scheduled flight.

Everything proceeded marvelously. The women’s niece accepted Dave at first with apprehension, but later with love and sympathy. Dave grew up oblivious to his place of birth until he reached a certain age, at which time his mother explained to him how he was adopted from a kind family in America. Dave was, of course, confused and angry at first, but later accepted his heritage and became proud of it.

Naturally, Dave converted to, or rather accepted as a child, Islam, and learned to talk and write in Turkish. He excelled in school, and eventually enrolled in a Turkish University, where he pursued his previously unknown passion for the dissection of animals. After college graduation, Dave easily found work at a museum in Turkey, where he currently happily works with his beloved wife.

He and his wife have recently had a child, Jacob (Dave insisted on an English name). Dave, though vaguely aware of his family in America, has no knowledge of his brothers’ identities and successes. His work, which has no involvement with the Internet, has kept him fascinated, preoccupied, and totally ignorant of his familial ties.

Sunday, October 27, 2013
Like most people who lead a lonely life, she was shy at first, but ended by becoming extremely communicative. The Adventure of the Cardboard Box-
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Thursday, September 26, 2013
abandonedography:

"A fisherman passes a shipwreck near the port of Greenville, Liberia. In the mid 1990s, a vessel arrived carrying an aid cargo of rice and fuel. The captain and crew left the ship when it developed a problem and was in danger of sinking. They returned the next day to find that the whole cargo had disappeared and the ship had been ravaged". 
Photo by Tim Hetherington

abandonedography:

"A fisherman passes a shipwreck near the port of Greenville, Liberia. In the mid 1990s, a vessel arrived carrying an aid cargo of rice and fuel. The captain and crew left the ship when it developed a problem and was in danger of sinking. They returned the next day to find that the whole cargo had disappeared and the ship had been ravaged". 

Photo by Tim Hetherington

Saturday, September 21, 2013

Bread

-Charlie Mcdonnell

Monday, September 16, 2013
I don’t think anyone wants a reader to be completely lost - certainly not to the point of giving up - but there’s something to be said for a book that isn’t instantly disposable, that rewards a second reading. John M. Ford (via writingquotes)
Sunday, September 15, 2013
The Halayeb Triangle (also spelled Hala’ib ; Arabic: مثلث حلايب‎ Mosallas Ḥalāyeb pronounced [moˈsællæs ħæˈlæːjeb]) is an area of land measuring 20,580 square kilometres (7,950 sq mi) located on the Red Sea’s African coast. The area, which takes its name from the town of Hala’ib, is created by the difference in the Egypt–Sudan border between the “political boundary” set in 1899 by the Anglo-Egyptian Condominium, which runs along the 22nd parallel north, and the “administrative boundary” set by the British in 1902,[1] which gave administrative responsibility for an area of land north of the line to Sudan, which was an Anglo-Egyptian client at the time. With the independence of Sudan in 1956, both Egypt and Sudan claimed sovereignty over the area. Since the mid-1990s, Egypt has exercised de facto effective administration of the area as part of the Red Sea Governorate, following the deployment of Egyptian military units there in the 1990s, and has been actively investing in it. [2]
The description of the area as a “triangle” is a rough generalization. Only the southern 290 kilometres (180 mi) demarcation, which follows latitude 22, is a straight line. While the whole area is north of the 22 degree line, a smaller area south of latitude 22, referred to as Bir Tawil, joins the Hala’ib Triangle at its westernmost point along the latitude line – neither Sudan nor Egypt claim Bir Tawil.[3]
The area is sometimes referred to in Egypt as the “Sudan Government Administration Area” or SGAA.

Wikipedia, “Hala’ib Triangle”


The zeal of fools offends at any time,
But most of all the zeal of fools in rhyme.
Alexander Pope
Saturday, September 14, 2013

Crash Course: The Mongols